Runners cheating, Dogs Hoarding and Other Friday Facts

Today’s schedule  called for 55 min. of cross training.  So this was my morning workout.

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By the end, I was gasping for breath and dripping wet.  It made running on the treadmill feel like a walk in the park.

As I was strolling through the internet (I’ve never been able to surf), I came across several headlines that really bothered me.  Cheating in sports.  Now I’m not talking about those professional athletes who have thousands or millions of dollars on the line.  I’m not even talking about the Elite runners who have reputations, sponsors, careers, etc.  I’m talking normal, everyday athletes.

Here are a few:

Professional cyclist gets six year ban for using an illegal motor in her bike.

                    Seriously?  What more can I say?

Triathlete says she didn’t cheat.  Video suggest otherwise.  

A section of the running course consisted of doing a loop twice.  This runner who finished in record time, was only on the video of the loop going around once.  She still claims she ran it twice.    The video was believed.

If you cheat in a marathon, try not to set a world record (2014).

      The runner finished the marathon in 2 hours, 55 minutes.  When the time at the half-way point was checked it was 2 hours, 6 seconds.  Meaning that this runner finished the last 13.1 miles in 55 minutes.    Wrong.

Of course, we’ve all read and discussed all the methods that people cheat to get in the Boston Marathon.

 

‘I messed up’: 61-year-old runner caught cheating on marathon route.  

For 50 minutes late in the race, the 61-year-old experienced runner from Washington left no record of his progress, but he reappeared at some point and ran at least the final five to six miles.     “We don’t know where he was,” said Rick Nealis, the race director. “He was sitting on a park bench or going in the Air and Space Museum. He’s doing something for 50 minutes, but I know he’s not running the race.”


(2012) A red-faced marathon runner has admitted cheating after he caught a bus to the finish line to clinch third place.

Rob Sloan, 31, became tired at the 20-mile mark of Sunday’s Kielder Marathon and hopped on the free spectators bus.   Just before the end of the race, he then disembarked the bus and emerged from a wooded section of the course to rejoin the race and pick up the bronze medal.

Witnesses reported seeing him hide behind a tree until the first and second placed runners went past, because coming first would be unrealistic, then rejoining the race behind them.  He “categorically denied” not completing the 26.2 mile course telling organizers: “I ran the whole race” in a statement on Monday.

But the runner, who just 24 hours earlier had won a 10K race, was spotted by a number of witnesses, and organizers were left with no alternative but to disqualify him after Sunday’s event – and he has now admitted his guilt.

 

(2015)   A Kenyan marathon runner who crossed the finishing line in second place was found to have  only ran the final 1,000 yards.

Detectives and race officials said Julius Njogu emerged from a crowd of spectators before joining Sunday’s race near the finish.  He was in line to claim around $7,000 in prize money before officials became suspicious that he did not appear fatigued despite supposedly running 26 miles.

SOOOOOO, do you find this as disturbing as I do?   I have no tolerance for liars or cheaters but I’m sure I’m not the only one.   I run/race for the fun of it.    All I can imagine is that these people need the accolades to feel good.

Enough of that, lets laugh a little:

 

Mr. UPS brought a box of goodies for the dogs today.  Apparently Gus thought his name was on all of them.

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So the Doodles ignored him and went for the tug-of-war rope.

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Yep — that lasted about ……oh 7 minutes.
But here’s how I justify it.   It wasn’t 7 minutes on a table leg…..

And now before I sign off, remember to never call a runner “obsessed”.

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Make it a great weekend and keep moving.

 

Anne

 

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