Category Archives: trail running

Walking, and Running with ‘Important Members of the Community’

Its been a good week for Patient Husband and I to get out and hike. The moderate temperatures gave us the perfect opportunities when I got off work.  First we we went on a trail across town.   We promised not to leave the path.

Hmmm.  Important members of the community and they will not attack.  I’ll keep my opinion.

 

The first 1/2 mile was a pretty good uphill incline and I heard some grumbling.
Our view near the top of the ‘hill’.

 

Our next walk was through a city park.  This was the most dangerous thing we saw.

 

And finally, we walked on a nearby road, and I just couldn’t ignore this:

 

I’ve been seeing HUGE flocks of these birds swooping together as they fly and then line up on the lines.  I’m not a birder, so I can’t tell you what they are but they are very neat to watch.

 

Patient Husband left super early this morning for Denver and will be back tomorrow.  I started my morning by seeing these amazing colors.

 

Then after work I took Jake to do some mountain climbing      trail running  on some new trails.

 

This greeted us at the trail head.  More important members of the community.

Please note what they say:  Do not run.  (yea right).  Appear Large.  I’m 5’1″ how large can I appear?    Back away…    And what happens when I trip over a root?

 

So off we went.  Luckily, the beginning of the trail was the worst with snow and mud. 

 

As I climbed up, there was switchback after switchback. 

I have to admit there were times I had to walk but there were also times I was able to hit the top of the hill without stopping.  My nephew, Michael the Ultrarunner, would have been proud of his old aunt’s attempts.

The view down.

 

Jake and I felt great when we finished (I could tell by his expression).  I think this is a sign of a good run.

I forgot my earphones, so I ran the whole trail without music or my audiobook.  The scariest thing on the whole trail seemed to be the sound of my breathing.  It certainly kept away all mountain lions, bears, and rattlesnakes.  It was either that or my speed.

I was using an app called Runkeeper.  How special is this?

 

Then since I had the night alone I did what all women want to do when home alone.  Put on the most comfy pants you can find.  And be sure to wear colorful socks.

 

Then after dinner (which can be whatever you want, i.e. cereal, ice cream or whatever) I applied a mud mask.
Make sure you do not let ANYone see you like this.  It’s a hard thing to wipe out of your memory.

I also gave myself a re-do on my toenail polish.  This is a before picture, by the way.

 

Then, throughout the evening, I kept up with my online games.
Yes, I realize I’m losing this game.   To finish up my evening on a high note, I finally got caught up on all my saved shows on t.v.

 

Another nephew of mine wrote a great article on nutrition.  I hope you will read it HERE.

 

How’s this for some motivation.  It really works for me.

          The first step to any goal is the hardest.
Look forward,
take a deep breath,
and make your move.

 

One step at a time,

Anne

 

I have a question.  Which was scarier – the mask picture or the foot picture?   🙂

 

 

Running, Decorating and No Regrets

I hope you are not using a chainsaw to clear away trees off your property, or waiting for floodwaters to recede or hoping a nearby fire will get under control.  There is just so much destruction around the country.   I am very happy to know that my nephew and his family in Florida are all fine.  My son in North Carolina even has lost power and sent me a picture of around his barn.

It’s hard to believe that the wind stayed so powerful that far from Florida.

 

 

Meanwhile, here in Wyoming the only thing across the road are guinea hens.

and the ever-present cranes.

 

 

One day when I was at a loss for activities, I decided it was time to decorate for fall.  So off I went to get some ‘fall stuff’.  And voila’ , a new wreath for my door.

 

And a little something for the mantle

 

 

Jack doesn’t care about anything except my pillow.

 

I have started looking at two new running programs.  One is called Runkeeper.   It’s very good.  The basic program is free, but there is also a ‘premium’ version.   It actually reminds me every 2 hours to drink water!

 

The other one I just started today.  It is an app called “Running for Weight Loss‘.   You choose your level (beginner, intermediate, etc.) and it does an 8 week program for you.  As you run or walk, there is a coach telling you to start walking, start running, etc.  It was fun today.  It has a program for 3 days a week.  That way you can pick the days you work out.

I will keep you updated or give you a review of them after I have used them a while..

I read the following article and it really hit home.  I’m not sure why – maybe its a sign of getting old!  But I thought I’d share anyway.

 

THOSE TOP 37 THINGS YOU’LL REGRET WHEN YOU’RE OLD.

  1. Not traveling when you had the chance.

Traveling becomes infinitely harder the older you get, especially if you have a family and need to pay the way for three-plus people instead of just yourself.

  1. Not learning another language.

You’ll kick yourself when you realize you took three years of language in high school and remember none of it.

  1. Staying in a bad relationship.

No one who ever gets out of a bad relationship looks back without wishing they made the move sooner.

  1. Forgoing sunscreen.

Wrinkles, moles, and skin cancer can largely be avoided if you protect yourself. You can use Coconut oil!

  1. Missing the chance to see your favorite musicians.

“Nah, dude, I’ll catch Nirvana next time they come through town.” Facepalm.

  1. Being scared to do things.

Looking back you’ll think, What was I so afraid of, comfort zone?

  1. Failing to make physical fitness a priority.

Too many of us spend the physical peak of our lives on the couch. When you hit 40, 50, 60, and beyond, you’ll dream of what you could have done.

  1. Letting yourself be defined by gender roles.

Few things are as sad as an old person saying, “Well, it just wasn’t done back then.”

  1. Not quitting a terrible job.

Look, you gotta pay the bills. But if you don’t make a plan to improve your situation, you might wake up one day having spent 40 years in hell.

  1. Not trying harder in school.

It’s not just that your grades play a role in determining where you end up in life. Eventually you’ll realize how neat it was to get to spend all day learning, and wish you’d paid more attention.

  1. Not realizing how beautiful you were.

Too many of us spend our youth unhappy with the way we look, but the reality is, that’s when we’re our most beautiful.

  1. Being afraid to say “I love you.

When you’re old, you won’t care if your love wasn’t returned — only that you made it known how you felt.

  1. Not listening to your parents’ advice.

You don’t want to hear it when you’re young, but the infuriating truth is that most of what your parents say about life is true.

  1. Spending your youth self-absorbed.

You’ll be embarrassed about it, frankly.

  1. Caring too much about what other people think.

In 20 years you won’t give a darn about any of those people you once worried so much about.

  1. Supporting others’ dreams over your own.

Supporting others is a beautiful thing, but not when it means you never get to shine.

  1. Not moving on fast enough.

Old people look back at the long periods spent picking themselves off the ground as nothing but wasted time.

  1. Holding grudges, especially with those you love.

What’s the point of re-living the anger over and over?

  1. Not standing up for yourself.

Old people don’t take sh*t from anyone. Neither should you.

  1. Not volunteering enough.

OK, so you probably won’t regret not volunteering Hunger Games style, but nearing the end of one’s life without having helped to make the world a better place is a great source of sadness for many.

  1. Neglecting your teeth.

Brush. Floss. Get regular checkups. It will all seem so maddeningly easy when you have dentures.

  1. Missing the chance to ask your grandparents questions before they die.

Most of us realize too late what an awesome resource grandparents are. They can explain everything you’ll ever wonder about where you came from, but only if you ask them in time.

  1. Working too much.

No one looks back from their deathbed and wishes they spent more time at the office, but they do wish they spent more time with family, friends, and hobbies.

  1. Not learning how to cook one awesome meal.

Knowing one drool-worthy meal will make all those dinner parties and celebrations that much more special.

  1. Not stopping enough to appreciate the moment.

Young people are constantly on the go, but stopping to take it all in now and again is a good thing.

  1. Failing to finish what you start.

Failing to finish what you start.

“I had big dreams of becoming a nurse. I even signed up for the classes, but then…”

  1. Never mastering one awesome party trick.

You will go to hundreds, if not thousands, of parties in your life. Wouldn’t it be cool to be the life of them all?

  1. Letting yourself be defined by cultural expectations.

Letting yourself be defined by cultural expectations.  Don’t let them tell you, “We don’t do that.”

  1. Refusing to let friendships run their course.

People grow apart. Clinging to what was, instead of acknowledging that things have changed, can be a source of ongoing agitation and sadness.

  1. Not playing with your kids enough.

When you’re old, you’ll realize your kid went from wanting to play with you to wanting you out of their room in the blink of an eye.

  1. Never taking a big risk (especially in love).

Knowing that you took a leap of faith at least once — even if you fell flat on your face — will be a great comfort when you’re old.

  1. Not taking the time to develop contacts and network.

Networking may seem like a bunch of crap when you’re young, but later on it becomes clear that it’s how so many jobs are won.

  1. Worrying too much.

As Tom Petty sang, “Most things I worry about never happen anyway.”

  1. Getting caught up in needless drama.

Who needs it?

  1. Not spending enough time with loved ones.

Not spending enough time with loved ones.

Our time with our loved ones is finite. Make it count.

  1. Never performing in front of others.

This isn’t a regret for everyone, but many elderly people wish they knew — just once — what it was like to stand in front of a crowd and show off their talents.

  1. Not being grateful sooner.

It can be hard to see in the beginning, but eventually it becomes clear that every moment on this earth — from the mundane to the amazing — is a gift that we’re all so incredibly lucky to share.

The Author: Kasim Kahn

 

 

One step at a time,

Anne